/page/2

amarilloo:

caseylalonde:

ponderpretties:

The Deer God is a breathtaking 3d pixel art game that will challenge your religion and your platforming skills.”

You play as a stag, it has pretty music and everything is so so pretty.
This game is beautiful and you should pledge on its kickstarter- it has only a month remaining!

Correction - 7 Days. 5k from goal.

$3,500 to go in a week!

(via aitorierana)

scriberia:

Colombia
René Higuita, Columbia’s goalkeeper, was known as ‘El Loco’ (‘The Madman’); he was famous for his ‘Scorpion kick’ – enough to give any coach a heart attack!

scriberia:

Colombia

René Higuita, Columbia’s goalkeeper, was known as ‘El Loco’ (‘The Madman’); he was famous for his ‘Scorpion kick’ – enough to give any coach a heart attack!

burninggreen:

myownsundays:

briderbigny:

hadtoomuchtodreamlastnight:

sorry tumblr

Too high for this shit

Not even high and this shit is bananas

holy shit

burninggreen:

myownsundays:

briderbigny:

hadtoomuchtodreamlastnight:

sorry tumblr

Too high for this shit

Not even high and this shit is bananas

holy shit

(Source: giantgagofficial, via superarchitects)

Tim Taylor - Domestic Erosion, 2003

(Source: gallowhill, via floresenelatico)

austinkleon:

Ad Reinhardt, How to Look: Art Comics

I wrote in 2011: “It frustrates me to no end that there isn’t an easily available collection of Reinhardt’s cartoons. They’re so brilliant.”

And lo’ and behold! Now there’s a collection. More about ‘em:

…long before Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Rauschenberg took shots at the high-mindedness of the postwar American avant-garde, Ad Reinhardt (1913-67) was blasting away from a privileged vantage in the middle of the fray. A wise-cracking contrarian whose penchant for dialectics would not allow him to hold any position he could not later undermine, he was a consummate art-world insider and a fierce defender of abstract painting. At the same time, his ingrained populism made him suspicious of the rhetoric and institutional power brokering that supports any art elite.

His visual and verbal assaults took their most lasting form in a series of cartoons and satires, done mainly for the liberal New York newspaper PM in the late 1940’s and for ArtNews in the early 1950’s…

The critic Thomas Hess wrote in a booklet for the 1975 edition that Reinhardt’s lampoons are ”like precious containers of the air of New York, 1946-61.” They are also like core samples from the artist’s brain, revealing a side of his personality not apparent in his canvases. Using cutouts from 19th-century illustrated books and periodicals, as well as line drawings and hand-drawn dialogue balloons, he concocted a style in which the surrealism of J. J. Grandville and Max Ernst was inflected with a tough Queens accent.

One of his recurring panels shows a stick figure pointing at a canvas of crisscrossed lines and asking, ”What does this represent?” The indignant painting, having grown eyes, a mouth, arms and legs, punches him in the jaw and answers with an even more aggressively New York question, ”What do you represent?’”

In the 16-panel ”How to Look at Art-Talk,” from 1946, he continues the question-answer format. ”Isn’t abstract art ‘just a design,’ just ‘composition,’ just an empty bucket into which one can drop some subject matter?” asks a young woman wearing a blindfold. To which her companion answers bluntly, ”No.”

Really beautifully produced book.

(via turnercris)

typeworship:

Sign Painters Film, released today.

A couple of month ago, in London, I had the pleasure of seeing a screening of the Sign Painters film and today it is available on general release. The documentary celebrates the hand-painted sign profession and tracks the industry’s fortunes through interviews with talented, colourful characters from across the USA. 

For me, the film follows in the footsteps of other excellent design related documentaries such as Helvetica and Linotype. It’s been filmed with real warmth and sensitivity and is often so palpable you can almost smell the paint. Watching that glossy liquid being swept so skilfully through each letter is enough to make any graphic designer wanting to pick up a paintbrush.

I had the opportunity to pose a few questions to Co-director, Faythe Levine:

What sparked off the idea that this subject might make a good film? 

The concept for making a documentary about traditional sign painting was rooted in my youth. I have always been interested in cityscapes, letters and painting but it wasn’t until I was living in Minneapolis in the late 90’s when some friends started hanging out at Phil Vandervaart’s sign shop. That’s when I put the signs I had seen around my neighbourhood together with a person.  Those friends went on to run full-time sign shops around the country (as well as Stockholm.) I went on with my art career and stumbled into making documentaries. After wrapping up my first film, I was surprised no one had tackled the subject; very little was available on the topic. As a documentarian adding quality content to a subject matter is ideal. Sam and I had collaborated in the past on many projects and knew we wanted to work on something larger, I approached him with the idea and we jumped in head first. 

Do you think the film has helped reignite and interest in the industry? 

Since the release of the companion book and the screening of the film we have seen a huge increase in younger folks being interested in the trade. I think our project’s timing was on point with a generational interest in old school methods and process. Sign Painters the book and filmhas been a jumping off point for many who have gone to look for information on the trade. 

What was the biggest ‘wow’ moment in making the film?

Sam [Macon] and I thought we had a bit of an understanding about the industry when we began shooting. We had no clue what we were getting into. The entire experience has given me a new respect for folks who dedicate themselves to an obsession rooted in practice.  There were also a few interviews where we left feeling like our brains had exploded by the incredible stories we heard. People are amazing and we were humbled by everyone who allowed us into their studios for interviews. 

(via typethatilike)

futurescope:

Prediction or Influence?
A History of Books that Forecast the Future
[via io9]

futurescope:

Prediction or Influence?

A History of Books that Forecast the Future

[via io9]

(via ambientintelligence)

amarilloo:

caseylalonde:

ponderpretties:

The Deer God is a breathtaking 3d pixel art game that will challenge your religion and your platforming skills.”

You play as a stag, it has pretty music and everything is so so pretty.
This game is beautiful and you should pledge on its kickstarter- it has only a month remaining!

Correction - 7 Days. 5k from goal.

$3,500 to go in a week!

(via aitorierana)

scriberia:

Colombia
René Higuita, Columbia’s goalkeeper, was known as ‘El Loco’ (‘The Madman’); he was famous for his ‘Scorpion kick’ – enough to give any coach a heart attack!

scriberia:

Colombia

René Higuita, Columbia’s goalkeeper, was known as ‘El Loco’ (‘The Madman’); he was famous for his ‘Scorpion kick’ – enough to give any coach a heart attack!

burninggreen:

myownsundays:

briderbigny:

hadtoomuchtodreamlastnight:

sorry tumblr

Too high for this shit

Not even high and this shit is bananas

holy shit

burninggreen:

myownsundays:

briderbigny:

hadtoomuchtodreamlastnight:

sorry tumblr

Too high for this shit

Not even high and this shit is bananas

holy shit

(Source: giantgagofficial, via superarchitects)

Tim Taylor - Domestic Erosion, 2003

(Source: gallowhill, via floresenelatico)

austinkleon:

Ad Reinhardt, How to Look: Art Comics

I wrote in 2011: “It frustrates me to no end that there isn’t an easily available collection of Reinhardt’s cartoons. They’re so brilliant.”

And lo’ and behold! Now there’s a collection. More about ‘em:

…long before Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Rauschenberg took shots at the high-mindedness of the postwar American avant-garde, Ad Reinhardt (1913-67) was blasting away from a privileged vantage in the middle of the fray. A wise-cracking contrarian whose penchant for dialectics would not allow him to hold any position he could not later undermine, he was a consummate art-world insider and a fierce defender of abstract painting. At the same time, his ingrained populism made him suspicious of the rhetoric and institutional power brokering that supports any art elite.

His visual and verbal assaults took their most lasting form in a series of cartoons and satires, done mainly for the liberal New York newspaper PM in the late 1940’s and for ArtNews in the early 1950’s…

The critic Thomas Hess wrote in a booklet for the 1975 edition that Reinhardt’s lampoons are ”like precious containers of the air of New York, 1946-61.” They are also like core samples from the artist’s brain, revealing a side of his personality not apparent in his canvases. Using cutouts from 19th-century illustrated books and periodicals, as well as line drawings and hand-drawn dialogue balloons, he concocted a style in which the surrealism of J. J. Grandville and Max Ernst was inflected with a tough Queens accent.

One of his recurring panels shows a stick figure pointing at a canvas of crisscrossed lines and asking, ”What does this represent?” The indignant painting, having grown eyes, a mouth, arms and legs, punches him in the jaw and answers with an even more aggressively New York question, ”What do you represent?’”

In the 16-panel ”How to Look at Art-Talk,” from 1946, he continues the question-answer format. ”Isn’t abstract art ‘just a design,’ just ‘composition,’ just an empty bucket into which one can drop some subject matter?” asks a young woman wearing a blindfold. To which her companion answers bluntly, ”No.”

Really beautifully produced book.

(via turnercris)

typeworship:

Sign Painters Film, released today.

A couple of month ago, in London, I had the pleasure of seeing a screening of the Sign Painters film and today it is available on general release. The documentary celebrates the hand-painted sign profession and tracks the industry’s fortunes through interviews with talented, colourful characters from across the USA. 

For me, the film follows in the footsteps of other excellent design related documentaries such as Helvetica and Linotype. It’s been filmed with real warmth and sensitivity and is often so palpable you can almost smell the paint. Watching that glossy liquid being swept so skilfully through each letter is enough to make any graphic designer wanting to pick up a paintbrush.

I had the opportunity to pose a few questions to Co-director, Faythe Levine:

What sparked off the idea that this subject might make a good film? 

The concept for making a documentary about traditional sign painting was rooted in my youth. I have always been interested in cityscapes, letters and painting but it wasn’t until I was living in Minneapolis in the late 90’s when some friends started hanging out at Phil Vandervaart’s sign shop. That’s when I put the signs I had seen around my neighbourhood together with a person.  Those friends went on to run full-time sign shops around the country (as well as Stockholm.) I went on with my art career and stumbled into making documentaries. After wrapping up my first film, I was surprised no one had tackled the subject; very little was available on the topic. As a documentarian adding quality content to a subject matter is ideal. Sam and I had collaborated in the past on many projects and knew we wanted to work on something larger, I approached him with the idea and we jumped in head first. 

Do you think the film has helped reignite and interest in the industry? 

Since the release of the companion book and the screening of the film we have seen a huge increase in younger folks being interested in the trade. I think our project’s timing was on point with a generational interest in old school methods and process. Sign Painters the book and filmhas been a jumping off point for many who have gone to look for information on the trade. 

What was the biggest ‘wow’ moment in making the film?

Sam [Macon] and I thought we had a bit of an understanding about the industry when we began shooting. We had no clue what we were getting into. The entire experience has given me a new respect for folks who dedicate themselves to an obsession rooted in practice.  There were also a few interviews where we left feeling like our brains had exploded by the incredible stories we heard. People are amazing and we were humbled by everyone who allowed us into their studios for interviews. 

(via typethatilike)

futurescope:

Prediction or Influence?
A History of Books that Forecast the Future
[via io9]

futurescope:

Prediction or Influence?

A History of Books that Forecast the Future

[via io9]

(via ambientintelligence)

saidthewalrus:

Enric Miralles Study of a Croissant

saidthewalrus:

Enric Miralles Study of a Croissant

(via arquitecturascorrientes)

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